Ryan Lockwood - Streets Agent 1:12 [subtitles]

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Опубликовано: 2014-01-02
Продолжительность: 02:27
twitch.tv/RyanLockwood - Watch more of Ryan's Speedruns the-elite.net - Goldeneye and Perfect Dark speedruns

Ryan Lockwood's narrated replay of his record-tying 1:12 Streets Agent run with subtitles. He's narrating his run over stream to a 50+ audience, shortly after achieving it. It was the first time he or anyone else watched the run.

Hundreds know Ryan Lookwood from his Twitch stream; dozens others have met him at our annual meetup. There are a lot of, um... idiosyncratic dudes that take to speedrunning, and Ryan Lockwood is no exception. He's an intense dude, in short.

Ryan is the second person to achieve the time of 1:12 on this level. Normally record ties aren't big news, but Ryan hit this time before getting 1:13. This is absurdly unlikely. 1:12 is one of the most frame-for-frame maxed times in GoldenEye, first accomplished by Marc Rützou in 2012, a player whose made a name for grinding hard to break/set records that are daunting to match. With 20+ people sharing the old record of 1:13 in early 2012, the prospect of 1:12 was a popular debate in the forums. A $100 bounty was posted for anyone who could get this time--legitimately--and after weeks of attempts, Marc won the "race". Only a few have shown serious intentions (or even interest) in matching the feat since. Technically, Ryan isn't among them, as 1:13 was his goal. But you'll see in the video that he had a good sense of what was on the line toward the end of his run.

The nuances of "modern" Goldeneye speedrunning may be hard to detect, but the novelty of this run's unlikeliness should not be. A 1:14 run Streets is probably a 1 in 20 event, with respect to Lockwood's ability. A 1:13 absolutely requires something random (see: RNG) -- the presence of a grenade launcher guard. Let's call 1:13 a 1 in 500 event. A 1:12 run leans on "RNG factors" even more, also requiring at least 3 "boosts" from gunfire (getting shot in the pack, pushing you ahead slightly). Let's suppose 1 in 10,000 odds for 1:12, in which case you can probably expect dozens of 1:13 runs before achieving 1:12. Think of this like a statistical outlier in a distribution plot -- perhaps a few hundred data points between 74.0 and 75.0 seconds, thousands between 74.0 an 76.0, and one 72.9.

[Written by Derek Clark]