Pushing the Absolute Limits of a Boeing 767 Over Thailand | Lauda Air Flight 004

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Опубликовано: 2019-08-08
Продолжительность: 04:56
Reupload! This is hopefully much, much better than my last Season Three uploads, and, hopefully even better than my old Lauda Air Flight 004 video. Lauda Air Flight 004 was a regularly scheduled international passenger flight between Bangkok, Thailand, and Vienna, Austria. On 26 May 1991, the thrust reverser on the No.1 engine of the Boeing 767-300ER operating the flight deployed in flight without being commanded, causing the aircraft to spiral out of control, break up, and crash, killing all 213 passengers and the 10 crew members on board. It was the 767's first fatal incident and third hull loss, as well as the deadliest aviation disaster to occur in Thailand. Lauda Air was founded and run by Formula One world motor racing champion Niki Lauda. Lauda was personally involved in the accident investigation.
Lauda Air Flight NG004 was a scheduled service from Hong Kong (HKG) back to Vienna (VIE), Austria. An intermediate stop was made in Bangkok (BKK), Thailand. The flight departed Bangkok at 23:02 hours. Some five minutes after takeoff the pilot-in-command stated "that keeps coming on," referring to a REV ISLN advisory warning. This indication appears when a fault has been detected in the thrust reverser system. The crew discussed the REV ISLN indication for about four and one-half minutes. The co-pilot read information from the Airplane Quick Reference Handbook as follows: "Additional systems failures may cause in- flight deployment" and "Expect normal reverser operation after landing." The pilot-in-command remarked "....its not just on, its coming on and off," he said, "...its just an advisory thing...," and shortly thereafter stated, "could be some moisture in there or something." At 23:12, the co-pilot advised the pilot-in-command that there was need for, "a little bit of rudder trim to the left." Fifteen minutes and one second into the flight the co-pilot exclaimed, "ah reverser's deployed," accompanied by sound similar to airframe shuddering, sounds of metallic snaps and the pilot-in-command stating "here wait a minute." With the deployment of the no. 1 engine thrust reverser, engine thrust was reduced to idle. Aerodynamic effects of the reverser plume in-flight during the engine run down to idle resulted in a 25 percent lift loss across the wing. The airplane stalled and entered an uncontrolled descent. Buffeting, maneuvering overload, and excessive speed caused pieces of the rudder and the left elevator to separate. This was followed by the down-and-aft separation of most of the right horizontal stabilizer from maneuvering overloads, as the crew attempted to control the airplane and arrest the high-speed descent. A torsional overload then caused the separation of the vertical and left horizontal stabilizers. The loss of the tail resulted in a sharp nose-over of the airplane, producing excessive negative loading of the wing. A downward wing failure was probably followed by the breakup of the fuselage. The complete breakup of the tail, wing, and fuselage occurred in a matter of seconds. The wreckage fell in mountainous jungle terrain.

PROBALE CAUSE: "The Accident Investigation Committee of the Government of Thailand determines the probable cause of this accident to be uncommanded in-flight deployment of the left engine thrust reverser, which resulted in loss of flight path control. The specific cause of the thrust reverser deployment has not been positively identified."

May those 223 fatalities be remembered by their grieving families.